What VR Headset Does Dantdm Use – Quick & Easy Guide

Are you wondering what VR headset Dantdm uses?

Let’s find out.

What VR Headset Does Dantdm Use?

Dantdam uses HTC Vive VR.

HTC Vive VR

HTC and Valve collaborated to create a VR headset called the HTC Vive. Both headsets were released in 2016.

Prices for both VR headsets have dropped significantly since their initial release, making them much more affordable than they were when they first came out.

The Vive has a larger field of view than the Rift, so it works better for some types of games. However, we prefer the Oculus Touch Controllers.

System Requirements

To use the HTC Vive, you need a fairly powerful PC. Just like the Oculus Rift.

HTC and Valve recommend an

  • An NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 or AMD Radeon R9 290 graphics card
  • An Intel i5-4500 or AMD FX 8150 CPU
  • 4 GB of RAM
  • HDMI 1.4 or DisplayPort 1.2 video output
  • a USB 2.0 port
  • Windows 7 SP1 and above

Design

While the Oculus Rift was designed to be subtle, the HTC Vive designers went out of their way to show off their design flair.

It was crafted almost entirely from a matte-black material, which resembles the one used by Major Motoko Kusanagi in the Ghost in the shell anime.

Instead of having a smooth faceplate, the Vive has 32 photosensors arranged in a grid pattern surrounding wells of varying depths.

Lens Distance

There’s a dial for adjusting lens distance along the bottom right side of the headset, and there’s a button to switch between the different user interface modes.

On the back of the phone, there’s a large camera sitting at the bottom middle of the line that leads to the prominent “HTC” logo.

Comfort

Once you’ve got the Vive on correctly, it’s quite comfortable.

From there, the biggest comfort issue was the cord constantly winding itself around my legs.

Controllers

Lighthouse and Chaperone

One of the biggest differences between HTC’s Vive headset and its competitor from Facebook, Oculus Rift, is room-scale VR. With the Vive, you can actually move around inside your virtual world.

Base Stations

It takes a team to achieve this task, starting with the base station, which floods your room with invisible infrared lights using LEDs and lasers.

The resulting image is captured by those carefully positioned photo sensors on the headset, controller, and camera.

Photo Sensors

Each controller detects when its corresponding sensor was activated by the light source, and then sends that information back to the main computer.

They then take that information and figure out where you are in a three-dimensional (3D) world and which way you’re facing it.

Valve’s Chaperone software

To prevent you from accidentally tripping over something or falling down, the Vive also has SteamVR’s Chaperone software installed.

Once you’ve traced out your space and Vive software has mapped your playing area, the Chaperone takes care of the rest.

If you step out of the demarcation zone, a thin green line appears. This warning system lets you know that you’re about to enter something and has a high chance of going viral.

Setup

There are lots of things that need to be just right for you to use Vive’s tracking capabilities effectively.

Your computer needs to have the right specifications and ports, but the space you’re trying to turn into a VR paradise also needs to be compatible with the HTC Vive.

Space

The large poster attached to the headset says that you need at least six feet by five feet of free space to use the headset. And that’s just for the headset.

Base Stations

You also need to consider the two base station, which tracks your movement and helps keep you from falling down.

If you want to achieve the best results, you’ll need to ensure that the speakers are placed at opposite ends of the room with a distance of at least 16 feet between them.

Controllers

It’s not just grabbing a gun and pulling the trigger; it’s actually shooting at something. And that’s exactly what Valve did when they shipped their first version of the Vive with its own set of motion controllers.

Design

As far as design goes, the controllers are definitely available. They look like something from a science fiction movie where they tried to give some toy balls a hardcore sci-fi makeover but ended up looking ridiculous.

The top of the device is framed by a clunkier hollow ring with photo sensors. Aside from the clunky aesthetics, these black plastic controllers offer a plethora of interactions via buttons, triggers, touchscreens, and trackpads located over their unique anatomies.

Trackpad

On the top right corner of the controller, you’ll find the touchpad, which is one of its most distinctive characteristics and functions as a scroll wheel.

Menu and System Dashboard Button

The touchpad has two larger buttons at its top and bottom, which are used for menu navigation and system dashboard access.

Pressing the Dashboard (power) buttons once will power on the controllers, while pressing them twice will bring up the menu screen. Pushing the Menu (options) buttons will open up the options menu.

Weight

Compared to the 1.4-oz Oculus Remote, these controllers weigh 7.2 oz. However, they’re considerably lighter than the 9.9-oz Xbox One Controller.

The Good

The HTC Vive offers an incredible virtual-realty experience with sharp visuals, excellent motion control, and full room sensing to move around in virtual spaces.

With Vive hardware, you can use it to figure out where your wall is, and an in-headset camera can be useful for seeing your room when wearing the headset.

The Bad

You need a powerful computer to use it. Wires and lots of hardware take up room and require some setup. SteamVR has a lot of software but is not always user-friendly for beginners.

Conclusion

If you want to try VR before making a purchase, we’d recommend getting the Oculus Rift instead. It’s cheaper and easier to set up, plus it’s got better content available.

However, if you already own a gaming PC and you’re looking for a new hobby, the HTC Vive is worth checking out.

If you have any questions feel free to comment below.

Author

  • Victor Marquez

    Victor is the Editor in Chief at Techtyche. He tests the performance and quality of new VR boxes, headsets, pedals, etc. He got promoted to the Senior Game Tester position in 2021. His past experience makes him very qualified to review gadgets, speakers, VR, games, Xbox, laptops, and more. Feel free to check out his posts.

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